Poetry Break: Sonnet V

Editor’s Note:

I just thought I’d share a quick anecdote about how we came to call our poetic posts a Poetry Break. My wife is a very smart but shy woman. And, she’ll kill me, but she’s a far better writer than I’ll ever be. She has a couple of published posts here, just search them out. When we were dating, despite her shy demeanor, she would often send me emails or texts with poems in them. When she did, she would title them – Poetry Break! It made poetry feel like it’s supposed to feel, like a beautiful distraction from the hustle and bustle 0f this crazy world. A peaceful interlude from concrete and capitalism. And now you know. 🙂

By Mark Cayou

 

A green eyed babe, too precious for this world,

Born unto Heaven, needed by the Lord.

Let trumpets resound, banners be unfurled!

Moments with her mama, loved and adored.

 

Mortal man dictates not how, when, or why

A cherub is spared inhumanity.

A family will mourn; mother will cry-

Angel be free from a world not for thee.

 

Heaven awaits your heart; mother be brave.

Your destiny is to not suffer pain

Of this cruel world from which you were saved.

All the stars of the night shine in your name.

 

Play amongst the Angels, my tiny dove;

You will be safe therein, for you are love.


Author’s Bio:

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Mark Cayou is a new and unique voice in the literary world. As a retired high school English teacher, Mark knows his way around everything from essays to Shakespearean sonnets. Although remaining active in education at a local middle school, Mark now has the time to pursue his more creative passions. Mr. Cayou’s work can be found on prose.com under the pen name Dark. Mark lives in the high country of Colorado with his wife Rebecca and their English Bulldog, Peanut.

Published posts on Two Drops of Ink:

1) Poetry & Prose by Mark Cayou


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S.W. Biddulph

Scott Biddulph is a published writer, author, and poet from North Georgia. He began writing as a youngster and followed his lifelong dream of reaching people through the written word when he returned to The University of North Georgia in 2013 to finish earning his BA/English with a concentration on publication and creative writing. His publications include the following: an eBook, Apples of Gold: A collection of inspirational short stories and poems (Smashwords, 2010) and a paperback, Voices from the Heart, (Createspace, 2012). His poetry is published in Papers and Publications Undergraduate Research Journal. Vol 3 (2014) and the award-winning Chestatee Review (Spring, 2015), among other places (Check his LinkedIn profile for a full list of his publications). He is currently working on publishing poetry, creative non-fiction, academic essays, and his memoir. ******** Scott has also worked as an intern editor for the University of North Georgia Press. As a freelance editor, he has done the layout and design of several books and magazines. He is currently working with several authors on various publication projects in which he is either ghostwriting, editing manuscripts, or doing the layout and design of their books. ******** Finally, and most importantly, he is a father, grandfather, husband, and dedicated Harley Davidson rider. He and his family enjoy the beauty of the North Georgia Mountains where they live—especially their screened in back porch where they love to bird watch. ******** ~ "I love realism. I love writing about the raw, down-to-Earth, heartfelt realities of life. I love to write in a way that reaches into the human soul—to take the greatest pains and struggles in life, and make them a blessing to others. Fantasy is a wonderful, interesting thing—but real-life situations, feelings, fears, and dreams are an unexplored ocean of stories that need to be told." ~ ~Scott Biddulph~

25 comments

  1. Mark, beautiful poem. I never had the pleasure of having children but I could definitely feel the emotions in your piece. My heart goes out to you and everyone who experienced the loss of a child.

    Like

  2. Thank you for your beautiful poem, Mark. My husband and I also have a baby in heaven, and even now, some 25 years after our loss, your words bring such comfort to my heart.
    In my line of work, I often come across mothers who are trying to work their way through such heartbreak. Would it be permissible to you (and is there a way to print out a copyrighted version) to share your poem with these women? I also have a friend who works exclusively with parents of stillborns, that I’d also like to pass your poem along to. I think it would bring both parents some much needed consultation in the midst of their grief.

    Scott, thank you for sharing the story of the origins of “Poetry Break.” Your wife sounds lovely. I would love to check out her poems but can’t find them on the site. Could you direct me?

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  3. Good morning, Mark. Thank you for such a consoling poem. I have sent this to a friend who recently lost her grandson.

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    • I hope it helps her with the loss, Marilyn. It was tough to put to paper, but worth every tear to console another. Thank you.

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  4. My first baby is in heaven and this line “A cherub is spared inhumanity” really made me realize, that for my baby, the inhumanity we see in the world is non-exsistant. What innocence. Not being subjected to anything but love is such a sweet and holy thing. A bittersweet blessing. Thank you for this poem.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Hey Scott,

    Hope you’re having a good time doing all the great stuff you have going on. Thanks again for allowing me to be on the bookshelf. I have started to spend more time on Two-drops, trying to get to know the gang, and looking for ways to participate. I’m in the process of weeding out some clutter I collected from finding my way around social media. I’m moving your site up in priority. When Lydia first exposed me to Two-drops I felt intimidated technologically. I’m pressing my way onward, lol.

    Just wanted to drop you a note to say how much I appreciate, not only the work, but the intention of your site.

    Don’t hide from your blessings, Rick

    On Mon, Mar 27, 2017 at 5:15 AM, Two Drops of Ink: A Literary Blog wrote:

    > S.W. Biddulph posted: ” Editor’s Note: I just thought I’d share a quick > anecdote about how we came to call our poetic posts a Poetry Break. My wife > is a very smart but shy woman. And, she’ll kill me, but she’s a far better > writer than I’ll ever be. She has a couple of published” >

    Liked by 2 people

    • Hello Rick, I just want to thank you for your very kind and thoughtful comments. It truly is our heart’s desire to be reciprocal in all that we do on the site – the principle of sowing seed and reaping the harvest. We hope to expose new writers and help broaden the audience of more seasoned writers. It seems to be working very well, and we are very grateful. Thank you for your loyal following and readership. Kind regards, Scott

      Liked by 2 people

    • I sincerely apologize for the incorrect reference on Monday to your name. I am still familiarizing with the format here.

      Like

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