I'm Giving Up the Hook - My Readers Aren't Fish two drops of ink marilyn l davis

I’m Giving Up the Hook – My Readers Aren’t Fish

By: Marilyn L. Davis

 

 

The Hook, Bait, and Clichés

 

“A good writer is a great writer when they can make the cliché work again.”― gossamersilverglow

 

 

Does the expression “hook the reader” qualify as a cliché? With over 139,000,000 posts written about how to hook readers, I think it does. Many of these posts offer sage advice on using catchy phrases that bait the hook, summaries that lure your readers, and images that capture their attention. 

 

Count the Clichés and Win a Mention

 

Some expressions are ingrained in our everyday language and culture. I thought it might be fun to issue a challenge to the readers, now that I’ve hooked you.

1. Just how many clichés can you find in the article?

2. What will you win for getting the correct number?

 

If you let me know how many clichés you find in this piece, you'll get a personal mention in a future article. Now, how's that for a hook? Click To Tweet

Did You Just Call me a Fish? 

 

When you have been around the block as many times, as I have, you’ve seen it all and realize there is nothing new under the sun. 

However, early in my online writing, I was often up the creek without a paddle, and behind the eight-ball with deadlines. I was just a babe in the woods when it came to writing; I thought each post had to be original. 

If I’d known that it just took some bait, I might have written more articles, and not focused on an original. However, I have a valid excuse for coming late to the party. One, I’m a recovering addict and two; I ran a women’s recovery home. 

Most days, I just had to have the patience of Job to do my job. I was as busy as a one-armed paperhanger, and even on a slow day, I was still busy as a bee. We were all paying the piper for our past actions. Some days I was just banging my head against a brick wall and feeling like I was between a rock and a hard place. But better late than never, we helped each other recover. 

 

Swimming in Circles

 

When the recovery house closed, I was rudderless, out on a limb, clueless, and in a tight spot. I knew others lost a job and were in the same boat, and although I appeared as cool as a cucumber on the outside, inside, I was scared sh%^L#@@. (My mother would have apoplexy if I wrote that word, and we all know that everyone has a cross to bear.)

So, what’s a girl to do? Put on her big girl pants.

 

Cast the Net Elsewhere

 

I wasn’t about to abandon ship, even if I couldn’t sail. I searched high and low for opportunities to make a living, remembering some musical aspirations I had as a child. Still, alas, I couldn’t carry a tune in a bucket, and I’d always danced to the beat of a different drummer, so the bright lights and big city weren’t for me. 

Furthermore, I wasn’t the drop-dead, gorgeous, kick-ass girl I once was. 

I was getting a little long in the tooth to consider an entirely fresh start, and the jury was still out whether I’d go back to counseling. 

Then it hit me like a ton of bricks; I had an ace in the hole. I just looked myself dead in the eye and said, “It’s as plain as the nose on your face. You’ve quit your day job; now you’ve got to write.” 

I’d written before, a 400,000-word recovery curriculum. Sure it was academic, but it was words. Coming from an educational writing background, I was a greenhorn in the world of online writing. I knew I’d have to bite the bullet and put my nose to the grindstone and get with the program.

 

Seek Out the Yonder Shore

 

Therefore, I wasn’t up the creek without a paddle; I just had to put the oars in another pond.

Closing the house was a blessing in disguise. I now had the time and inclination to see how real online writers write, so I decided, in for a penny, in for a pound. I also wasn’t going to bellyache about my situation, as, in all likelihood, complaining would fall on deaf ears.

The strong don’t cry over spilled milk, so I decided to grab the bull by the horns and write online. I started with original pieces. 

Even though my readers knew I was a babe in the woods, I wasn’t blowing smoke. Sure my writing was a little rough around the edges, but my readers knew it was the real McCoy. Even though I wasn’t firing on all cylinders, I was dotting the I’s and crossing the T’s. 

But I didn’t have a clue that there were so many expressions commonly used that would have saved me from myself. Even though I was late to the party, I was chomping at the bit to bypass the shallow end of the pool and dive headfirst into the deep end of online writing.

 

Who’s Got Better Bait? 

 

Then, I started checking out the competition. Many of those successful online writers offered writing seminars, and although they had a bunch of clichés in their articles, I knew they weren’t crying all the way to the bank. 

Time was of the essence; I had to stop spinning my wheels and think outside the box. I needed to make hay while there was still sunshine, so I relied on the tried and true, sink or swim, do or die attitude I’ve had most of my natural life. 

I’m one old dog that can still hunt, and I didn’t fall off the turnip truck yesterday. Those attitudes made it possible to open my mind to the endless possibilities of online writing.

I had a light-bulb moment; all I needed to do was beat the bushes looking for inspiration to kick-start my online writing career.

“. . . A good writer should draw the reader in by starting in the middle of the story with a hook and then going back and filling in what happened before the hook. Once you have the reader hooked, you can write whatever you want as you slowly reel them in.” ― Roland Smith, Where’s the Bait? 

Roland Smith wasn’t the only one I looked for advice, so I cast the net further and realized my trusty writing books had inspiration, too!

 

Consult the other Fishermen

 

I like Spock and feel a kinship and special bond with him. Wading into the deep end of the pond and hitching my dreams to the nearest star, I started reading William Zinsser’s, On Writing Well, and Max Morenberg’s, Doing Grammar. 

Surely these two would point me in the right direction since they both write about original, grammatically correct writing.

Then there’s a whole world of writers that give readers the no-holds-barred, increasingly apparent, everybody knows what we are talking about expressions, too.

I pondered and decided that maybe I needed to plant my writing feet on the more common ground and stop trying to go where no man has gone before with original ideas and topics. Back to the drawing board, because, even though I’m old as the hills, I can still be taught new tricks.

 

Where’s My Place in the Sun?

 

I was going to hunker down and find my sweet spot with this online writing endeavor. It was becoming increasingly evident that many articles were written because the author knew which way the wind was blowing – give readers an increasingly easy format to follow. 

Unfortunately, every fiber of my being was screaming, “Don’t go there.”

But, the facts of life for online writing were clear, if I were going to be successful, I couldn’t go against the grain. I hate to say this, and I know if you don’t have anything nice to say, you should keep your mouth shut, but I saw that clichés were typical on popular writing sites. 

I then decided I would become the newest poster child for clichéd writing. But when push came to shove, I couldn’t bring myself to be the spitting image of someone else. 

 

I’m Not Fishing Today

 

Alas, however much I tried to get with the program, I still respected my readers enough not to think of them as fish. Click To Tweet 

 

I had to draw the line somewhere. So, while I get the drift of many of the clichés, I ain’t fishing today. 

I knew that hooking my readers was barking up the wrong tree. I vowed to spend time being authentic, original, and creative. I was hoping that this approach would make me stand out like a sore thumb. 

Although I’m sweating bullets wondering if I’m too far out on the limb, I’m going to keep a stiff upper lip, start from scratch, and hope that words don’t fail me now.

Stay tuned readers; there’s an original article to follow. Oh, and have a nice day. 

 

 

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Have a funny story? An inspiring memoir? What an additional platform for your writing advice, poem, or essay? Are you looking to get your book a wider audience? Then consider submitting a guest post to us. All those back links might be the bait you need for new readers. 

 

 

 

15 comments

  1. HaHaHa! Marilyn, I chuckled all the way through this post! You are so proficient with the expeditious use of cliche’s! An expose’ on the overexposure of the common terms we utilize in everyday conversation. But, that is so American!

    I stopped counting at 2, 02, and 002 (a sidekick of James Bond!).

    Must admit it was a surprise to see an entire article can be written with cliche’s, had not given it much thought. Boy, oh boy…loud message declaring what a lazy writer can accomplish with zero original input!

    Mysteriously, by the end of your draft I felt some relief about being a non-fisherman and a non-writer.

    Fun, entertaining, and definitely unhooked me!

  2. HaHaHa! Marilyn, I chuckled all the way through this post! You are so proficient with the expeditious use of cliche’s! An expose’ on the overexposure of the common terms we utilize in everyday conversation. But, that is so American!

    I stopped counting at 2, 02, and 002 (a sidekick of James Bond!).

    Must admit it was a surprise to see an entire article can be written with cliche’s, had not given it much thought. Boy, oh boy…loud message declaring what a lazy writer can accomplish with zero original input!

    Mysteriously, by the end of your draft I felt some relief about being a non-fisherman and a non-writer.

    Fun, entertaining, and definitely unhooked me!

  3. HaHaHa! Marilyn, I chuckled all the way through this post! You are so proficient with the expeditious use of cliche’s! An expose’ on the overexposure of the common terms we utilize in everyday conversation. But, that is so American!

    I stopped counting at 2, 02, and 002 (a sidekick of James Bond!).

    Must admit it was a surprise to see an entire article can be written with cliche’s, had not given it much thought. Boy, oh boy…loud message declaring what a lazy writer can accomplish with zero original input!

    Mysteriously, by the end of your draft I felt some relief about being a non-fisherman and a non-writer.

    Fun, entertaining, and definitely unhooked me!

  4. Wow, I lost count after 70. 🙂 Thanks for making me smile, dear Marilyn. By the way, asking us to count the cliches was an excellent hook.
    Blessings ~ Wendy

    • Hi, Wendy. Glad you smiled. You’re close. So, your name is in the hat.

  5. I lost count after 78. Funny stuff here Marilyn. I think I’ve been around the block with you because I knew them all. And, I agree that we often get caught up in the writing “rules.” I’ve decided to give up on SEO and writing the formulaic blog headline. I’ve just gotta be me.

    • Hi, Jayne. You, and me will just continue using Frank Sinatra’s message- we’ll just be us! Thanks for the comment and getting past some of your least favorites- “thinking outside the box” (reference to your equally funny Hump Day post).

  6. Hi, Hibah. I hope you visit Two Drops of Ink again, and give us another smiley. They brighten the day.

  7. Hi Marilyn – Such a cleverly crafted post using the very cliches you are railing against! 🙂 I’m with you – let’s drop the hook, we aren’t catching fish. I believe that your authentic, original and creative posts are indeed standing out!
    Oh and by the way, I too have ridden many turnip trucks – just ask my kids. More times than they cared to – they heard me exclaim (usually in response to one of their latest escapades), “Do I look like I just fell off the turnip truck!??” lol!
    Enjoyed your post, Marilyn!

    • Hi, Terry. Thanks for the encouraging comment. Glad to know those trucks are everywhere.

  8. My goodness Marilyn! You had me hook, line, and sinker. I really had to think outside the box to penetrate this ole noggin. I always wondered if writing would be a drop in the bucket? You have proven time and time again, writing is possible if you put your mind too it. Just saying. 🙂

    • Hi, John. Your noggin works fine. About that drop in the bucket…appreciate you continuing the spirit of the post!

  9. I counted 728,000 cliches in this posting. Over the weekend I’m going to take my fishy friends to see the movie “Guardians of The Galaxy” and we will write a review of the movie. Was that a hook?

    • Hi, Tim. I suppose the 728,000 could qualify if it was about letters. However, even I couldn’t write 728,000 cliches in a single post – I don’t know that many! Thanks for your comment, though, and I’ll wait with baited breath for your review. (Okay, I’m going to leave the fish stuff alone for today).

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